How The Aircraft's Air Brake Works

. In this session, we are going to discuss the main function of aircraft’s brake and how it works. If you eager to know more, stay tuned and watch this video ‘till the end! Most commercial airplanes cruise at a speed of 500 to 600 mph at cruising altitude. However, they are required to moderate their speed when landing, as normal aircrafts usually have landing speed of 160 to 170 miles per hour. The aircraft also need to quickly brake when they hit the runway until they come to a complete halt. But the question is, how exactly airplane’s brake works? The design of an airplane was meant to make it aerodynamically safe and able to minimize drag as much as it can in order to decrease fuel consumption and enhance performance.

However, this condition produces a significant side effect where an aircraft is not able to decelerate quickly, specifically when descending. This is where aircraft’s brake should come into play. On many commercial planes, wing spoilers primarily assists the landing braking. Spoilers are extensible flaps on the edges of an airplane's wings. As the plane approaches the runway, the pilots can raise the spoilers to slow it down. In this state, pilots will often leave the wing spoilers high even while on the runway. Raised wing spoilers generate drag, which slows the plane down and allows it to brake more rapidly. On the other side, high-performance military aircraft utilized speed brakes, also known as air brakes or dive brakes, to regulate speed during rapid descent or to quickly lower speed during level flight.

How The Aircraft's Air Brake Works

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